Now Republicans no longer believe in republicanism

I can understand if Republicans have an issue with the democracy thing. True democracy is direct rule by the people, which you can still find here in many towns here in New England. Those who show up at the town meeting get to vote on pressing local issues, which around here include weighty matters like whether to buy a new backhoe for the Town of Hadley.

Democracy won’t work on the national level, so our government was formed as a republican (representative) democracy. In a republic, democracy becomes indirect. You elect someone who reflects the will of the majority of voters (or a plurality, in some cases) in the district or state.

Democracy and republicanism are so fundamental to our country that our two major parties are the Democrats and the Republicans. Based on many egregious actions by state houses in Republican-controlled states though, the Republican Party no longer believes in its presumably founding principle: the virtue of a republican government.

Granted there’s been plenty of evidence this is true for many decades. It’s resulted in voter suppression laws and gerrymandered districts. All have one aim: to minimize the number of people Republicans don’t want voting and the power they could wield.

In Georgia though Republicans went crazy. A new law signed in by their Republican governor includes these way over-the-top voter suppression efforts:

  • It’s now illegal to give food and water to voters waiting to vote, a practice only made necessary because the state reduced polling places in minority precincts
  • It allows unlimited challenges to voter registrations
  • Mail in voting requires attaching a copy of your driver’s license or other state issued ID
  • It’s against the law for any group to mail you an absentee ballot application
  • Mobile voting sites are illegal
  • Voting out of precinct is illegal before 5 PM on voting day
  • Vote drop boxes must be inside facilities, not outside them
  • Their secretary of state no longer chairs the state’s election board
  • The same board can temporarily suspend county election directors if they feel their elections need review. That way the counts can be added up “correctly”.

Georgia is but the most egregious and latest example of extremely alarming changes to voting rules by Republican-controlled states. These changes are actually signed into law now, while queues of other restrictive voting laws are being introduced in other states.

One state legislator in Arizona filed a bill that would have allowed the state to appoint its own electors to the Electoral College, which decides who will be president. Fortunately that was dropped, but a total of nineteen changes are being considered. In Pennsylvania, at least fourteen voting changes have been proposed that amount to new Jim Crow laws. The same is true in Michigan and many other states.

In short, Republicans are fine with people voting, as long as they can guarantee they will be elected. And if they can’t be, at least some Republican states are exploring allowing their legislatures to overturn the will of the voters, at least when it comes to who will receive their state’s electoral votes.

The animus of all this is hardly new: racism. Here it is 2021 and in these states they are still freaking out that people of color have voting rights! Moving toward the political center is apparently out of the question. They must have their cake and eat it too. They cannot compromise.

I fear where all this is heading. The long overdue response to all this is H.R. 1, the For the People Act, which Democrats have introduced. It would outlaw most of these voter suppression and gerrymandering tactics, and set uniform voting standards across the various states. It would in effect enable true republicanism, something that is increasingly anathema to actual Republicans! If this becomes law, it’s not hard to see what some states will prefer instead: open insurrection and a new civil war.

The bill is a five-alarm fire for the Republican Party. No wonder Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell is sweating bullets over possibly getting rid of the Senate filibuster. For more than a hundred years, the primary use of the filibuster has been to control people of color and make sure they have fewer privileges than the rest of us. It appears the thing that Republicans fear most is not those they don’t like getting power, but having to compromise their racist principles in order to get power.

The For the People Act is not necessarily great news for the Democratic Party either. By outlawing gerrymandering, it could end up actually serving the aim of Republicans to put Democrats in the minority. What it is likely to do though is to break the gridlock by electing slews of moderates who are now largely locked out of Congress. This act could actually make government work again.

That’s a price this Democrat is happy to pay.

Republicans are inadvertently voting themselves off the island

Last I heard, today was revolution day, take two. The insurrection of the Capitol on January 6, 2021 failed but at the cost of a half dozen deaths.

Today is the day Trump is finally supposed to become president again somehow, or maybe it’s king. This appear to be the latest conspiracy theory going around the QAnon channels. This may be a crazy threat, but it was enough for the House of Representatives to decide to cancel its session today. Last I heard, the Senate hadn’t succumbed to fear.

Why March 4th? That’s because it was the date originally set for presidential inaugurations. Set at a time when it could take weeks or months to get across the nation, it made sense. The 20th Amendment though changed the date to January 20th. But I guess that’s not constitutional enough for some of these QAnon-ers. So today must be the day a “real” president would take office and that can’t be Joe Biden because Trump said the election was stolen from him. Case closed, or rather these minds closed.

I don’t expect Congress to be overrun today, unlike on January 6th when I did expect this. In fact, I blogged about it before the event. Unlike on January 6th, this time we now have a Congress that realizes these QAnon-ers may be crazy, but they at least now have a track record. Also, we have a new president. The last one helped foment the insurrection itself.

The Capitol is now something of a fortress. Anyhow it’s hard to get into and out of with all the temporary fencing and razor wire. In addition, there is still a National Guard presence at the Capitol; they never quite left. So there’s no ready soft target anymore. There are rumors that date has been moved to March 6th, presumably because it’s two months to the day since the insurrection. But that’s on a Saturday, so it doesn’t bode well for hanging Mike Pence or Nancy Pelosi.

So I’m not losing sleep over what may happen today. But l am pretty disturbed (but not surprised) about how the post-Trump age is turning out. While insurrection may be out for the moment, it’s time for Republicans to dial it up to eleven on gerrymandering and voter suppression. Over three hundred bills have been introduced in state legislatures to make it harder for people, particularly people of color, to vote. There is good evidence that voter suppression tactics are counterproductive to Republican’s aims. For while it may make it harder for people of color to vote, it also makes it harder for rural Republicans to vote too. Many of them will prefer to sit out the next election, especially those less vested in the cult of Donald Trump. Also, many Republicans are leaving the party because of January 6th.

These Republican moves have a feeling of desperation about them. While covid-19 killed a lot of people of color, it also killed a lot of the Republican voting base: older white people, particularly the obese and non-mask wearing types. The party has become a party of White grievance, which is not a great platform for attracting others necessary to keep the party viable. In addition, the party is taking unpopular stances. Not a single House Republican voted for the latest covid-19 bill, even though a majority of Republicans polled support it.

Still, these efforts are enough to worry that our democracy is slipping away. Recent Supreme Court arguments on a case attacking the 1965 Civil Rights Act suggest a majority of the court is priming to make what’s left of the law unconstitutional.

So there is plenty of onus to enact the For the People Act through Congress. This bill would require congressional districts be drawn impartially, set national voting standards and require universal mail in voting. The Act has passed the House and has now moved to the Senate. Currently it would be subject to filibuster, which has many Democrats arguing it’s time to get rid of the filibuster altogether.

It’s a compelling argument, especially now, because if Democrats don’t then these new voting laws and redistricting would tilt the playing field even more toward the advantage of Republicans. It’s hard to understand the hesitancy of some wavering Democratic senators. The filibuster has been chipped away at for more than twenty years. Republicans have shown no hesitancy to chip away at it when they wielded power. Nor has it proven a method for brokering bipartisan compromise. Rather, it’s done just the opposite. It needs to die.

I often wish there were a way to keep people from believing insane stuff. Americans seem to love conspiracy theories but Donald Trump elevated them and made them mainstream. There doesn’t seem to be a way to put this genie back in its bottle. Because Trump supporters are not reality based, real life is bound to disproportionately impact them, as demonstrated by the many covid-19 victims among staunch Trump supporters. There are plenty of Herman Cains out there to serve as examples, but it doesn’t seem to move them back toward sanity.

We learned during CPAC that Donald Trump got covid-19 shots in January while still president. You would think that might wake up some of them to get the vaccine or at least put on a mask. Instead, we get Texas Governor Greg Abbott ending all masking requirements in the state, a stunningly premature act guaranteed to kill off more of his staunchest supporters. This was done probably to draw attention away from his gross mismanagement of Texas’s electricity infrastructure, which resulted in widespread power and water outages during a recent cold snap.

It increasingly looks to me the best case is actually the worst case: Republicans have voted themselves off the island by becoming victims of their own foolishness. We can only hope that those of us who remain are sensible. I know I am. I don’t want to die. But if I die from covid-19 and it’s because of one of these foolhardy people then I will die deservedly a bitter and angry man.